Chest X-ray: Lung Pathology IV

Okay, here is the last article in the Chest X-ray series for now. We will do a quick and very brief job at covering pulmonary vasculature. As a note, this lecture is largely anecdotal, meaning this is based upon personal experience and makes sense to me but was not learned directly from any single textbook […]

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Chest X-ray: lung pathology I

Onward with chest we go! Pathology described for non-medical people is basically anything not “normal” in the body. Sometimes it can be really bad like cancer, it could also be a benign lesion (it’s not normal but it’s not going to kill you either), it could be congenital (a developmental/birth abnormality), and on and on. […]

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Chest X-ray – mediastinum anatomy

The mediastinum describes the central structures seen on a frontal chest radiograph. Remember, left and right are “flipped” with sidedness determined by the patient’s perspective (their right and left). In the center of the chest is the heart and mediastinum. The mediastinal structures consist of the thymus, trachea/airway, esophagus/food pipe, lymph nodes and the large […]

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Chest X-ray: lung anatomy

Okay, let’s get into some basic anatomy of the lungs. First off it is critical for you to know that there is an “anatomic” position, meaning there is a standard convention for locating body parts. A person could be pictured laying on their back with hands down at their sides and palms up. Viewing is […]

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